Discussion Starts August 21, 2018

SUPER EXCITED TO HEAR WHAT YOU THOUGHT OF THE BOOK

Here are a few things to keep in mind

Just like with our monthly giveaways answer the questions you want leave the rest.

We will be having this discussion for the rest of the month - you can make comments even at the beginning of next month too. Don't worry if you haven't finished the book yet.

Please be respective of others opinions. The beauty of book club is seeing what others find and/or see in the story because of their life's experiences.

It's fun when we discussion things with the author that people find things they didn't even know was in there.

OK, I'm going to list questions below. You can answer ONE A DAY if that works for you.

JUMP IN and ANSWER the ones you want to when you can.

REMEMBER We have The Rest of the month to have this discussion.

1. Anything you found fascinating, intriguing? Learn something new? do tell!

2. What was unique about the setting of the story? How did it enhance or take away from the novel?

3. Did certain parts of the book make you feel uncomfortable? If so, why? Did this lead to a new understanding and/or awareness of an event? Situation?

4. Did the characters seem authentic and believable in their roles? Which characters experienced growth and change over the course of the story, and which remained static?

5. Which characters in the book would you most like to meet? Why?

6.In Chapter 9 Wren (Lauren) Hunt tells Emily, "Only by losing everything could I gain the one thing I would've overlooked. Need."

Why would she see "need" as a gain instead of a detriment?

7. Historically, the English people were skittish about having an organized police force. They felt it impinged upon their privacy. At what point does a government-run organization cross the line into privacy invasion?

ANYTHING ELSE YOU WANT TO TALK ABOUT/SHARE?

PLEASE DO! GRIN!

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Replies to This Discussion

I was hooked from the start. Here are the First couple of lines, "You, sir, are a rogue! Emily Payne scowled into the black marble gaze fixed on hers, determined to win the deadlock of stares. Horrid beast. Must he always triumph?"

Just from this little bit we get a feel for Emily as she has it out with her puppy! She is a feisty one who knows how to get her way. Most of the time getting herself in trouble. Thank goodness for Brentwood! I really liked him. What did you all think about him? Emily?

I loved this line she gives Mary the house keeper after her father has left the house, "My father said not to leave the house this morning. But, Mary dearest" - she opened the door and winked over her shoulder - "did you know that right now it's afternoon in India?"

I had to laugh out loud at this point. That's what I loved about this book too. The authors scene of humor runs through out this novel.

I really did not like this book. It seemed like the author had a list of things to add to the book and this was the only reason the things were in the book. In addition, the characters were very wooden. However, the historical things about the pre-police force were fascinating. If I can learn something new, I get excited!

Hi, Sharen;

You may not have liked the leading characters but I'm so glad you found the historical aspect of the pre-police force fascinating. I did too. I liked what the authors shared in author notes about this topic. She says, "Despite Bow Street's efforts, most Londoners were opposed to the development of an organized police force. The English tradition of local government was deeply ingrained, and they feared the loss of individual liberty. So, as gallant as the runners were in tracking down criminals, the general public did not always view them in a positive light. Even the nickname given them by the public - Bow Street Runners - was considered derogatory and was a title the officers never used to refer to themselves.

Bow Street Eventually gave way to the Metropolitan Police, and by 1839, the runners were completely disbanded.  She then suggests three other books readers can read about The Bow Street Runners. This kind of goes along with this question.

7. Historically, the English people were skittish about having an organized police force. They felt it impinged upon their privacy. At what point does a government-run organization cross the line into privacy invasion?

After September 11th the assault on our Privacy has been an invasion. They've taken advantage of people and information all in the name of their war on terrorism. I don't think that we ever imagined things would be like they are.

GREAT To Hear from you some more about this topic!

#3. Overall I liked this book, but there were a couple of things that made me uncomfortable. The first was the anger that we saw from Emily's "uncle," the father of Wren's child, and the eligible bachelor that Emily wanted to marry (I forgot his name.). I wasn't turned off by it, but seeing real issues in fiction is sometimes uncomfortable. Anger and rape are sad facts of life, and they have been around for centuries.

Something else that made me uncomfortable was how Emily called people relatives, but they weren't really her relatives. The anger of the "uncle" combined with the fact that he really wasn't her uncle made the situation more grave. I would have thought she should have been more concerned with his behavior. Also, who was her real father? She really had a relaxed attitude about her "father" not actually being her father. It was a little unsettling. 

Did this lead to new understanding or awareness of an event? Maybe this is why she wanted the rich eligible bachelor to turn his head her way. Men provided a means of support and a source of family...even if the love wasn't there.

Right now I wish this book was more fresh in my head. I'm looking forward to reading other people's comments, so I remember the details again, such as the eligible bachelor's name.

Hi, Becky;

Great to hear from you. Thanks for the things that made you feel uncomfortable.  You mentioned "I wasn't turned off by it, but seeing real issues in fiction is sometimes uncomfortable. Anger and rape are sad facts of life, and they have been around for centuries."

"I would have thought she should have been more concerned with his behavior. Also, who was her real father? She really had a relaxed attitude about her "father" not actually being her father. It was a little unsettling. " I AGREE!

We will be discussing this book until the end of the month. So jump in when you can!

I devoured the book. I wanted to discover what happened next. I enjoyed the humor throughout; the burnt wig scene was too funny! 

Occasionally, I was confused but kept on to see if more explanation would occur. I can't give an example right now. I guess I should have taken notes even though I did underline in my Kindle at times. 

To answer part of #4, Emily changed the most. She was a terribly spoiled young woman when we met her. She had much to learn about herself, how to treat others, and what kindness and giving mean to relationships. Closer to the end of the novel we discover what probably led to her selfishness and I gained more sympathy for her circumstances. I'm not sure how she transformed but her desire to perform for Nicholas must have driven her. Then her love for him broke through her spirit. He took strength from God but she didn't have that element.

I am a fan of Michelle Griep. Some of her other books go into further detail in fleshing out her characters.

That's all I have to say for right now.

Hi, Sharon;

I agree with you about Emily changing the most. She was spoiled for sure and didn't give thought to how she was putting herself in danger.  I think encountering the little girl named Hope, that Nicholas had watching his very sick sister and then meeting Jenny herself. She has an amazing outlook on life and an intimate relationship with God. 

Jenny talks to Emily about Nicholas, "You've done him much good, you know. You've taken his mind off me. It's God's plan. I am sure of it."

Emily snorted, "Some plan. I've brought him nothing but trouble."

"You've given him purpose." A frown etched her lips. Purpose for what? Risking his own life?"

"Nicholas has always taken care of me....Always, from the time our parents died. I was five. He, no older than Hope."..."We managed by God's grace, he and I, though sometimes it's hard for him to see that. Don't get me wrong his faith is solid, it's just that sometimes...well..."..."Sometimes Nicholas forgets that he's not the one in control...."You need to remind him."

Being inside this little room with Nicholas sister, Jenny and Hope, who is full of spunk and takes her job of caring for Jenny seriously, starts Emily looking at life and faith in a brand new way. She might have started to change before this time but there was a definite shift after this encounter.

I hope to hear more from you once you have time to reflect and remember the story! 

I loved the character of Jenna the most and would like to have had her in better circumstances, it was very sad when she died. 

It was a sad time when she passed. Jenna and Hope were inspiring side characters I enjoyed.

This is the second book I've read by Michelle Griep. I liked The Captive Bride better, but I did enjoy Brentwood's Ward.

1. Anything you found fascinating, intriguing? Learn something new? do tell! I had never heard of the Bow Street Runners so that was something new! I found the story intriguing as far as the plot and it held my attention from the beginning to end. I absolutely loved how Nicholas was super aware of everything and able to deduce things about people simply from small actions they made.  Wish I was that attentive/understanding!

4. Did the characters seem authentic and believable in their roles? Which characters experienced growth and change over the course of the story, and which remained static? I found Emily a bit annoying at parts, mostly when she refused to take the danger around her seriously, in the early part of the story. She did grow and change and in the end I liked her .  I found it a bit unrealistic that she was almost raped by Charles Henley and there didn't really seem to be any lingering negative issues. It just seemed like maybe that should have had more effect on her than it did...

5. Which characters in the book would you most like to meet? Why? I would like to meet Nicholas Brentwood. As I said before I admired the way that he could pick up on little things and figure out hidden information about people. A natural detective!

Great to hear from you Jolene;

#1 I'd never heard of the Bow Street Runners either. Nor knew people protested having a police force. I enjoyed Nicholas too. The author showed a variety of situations Nicholas was in so you could get to know him well. From him caring for his sister, to taking the job seriously of protecting Emily even thought she was reckless at times, and he was creative in his police work. I found the scene with Nicholas giving his partner Flannery pointers on how to walk like a lady (he was pretending to be Miss Payne to attract those men after her.) Nicholas says, "...call it what you will, man, but you must learn to walk without losing your oranges."

He says to Nicholas, "Who's to be believin' I'm Miss Payne when I nearly equal her height, am wider in the shoulders, narrower in the hips, and a flamin' carrot top to boot?"..."Which is why we'll take our stroll in the dark." I liked the authors mix of humor, suspense and a natural flow the spiritual side of things. 

#4 - I was frustrated by Emily and her roaming about not giving one thought to the danger she was in and/or she put others in trying to save her.  Yes, the almost assault on Emily by Charles didn't shake her up very much you are right. 

#5 I liked Nicholas too but I'd most like to meet the little girl named Hope. I liked her spunk and out look on things. She was an old soul in a little body. I'd like to talk with her a little while and get her take on a few things.

I just finished the Captured Bride. It was amazing. I am not a history buff so I appreciate fiction that allows me to learn through characters I enjoyed hanging out with.  It showed another side of this authors talents.  I did enjoy learning about the time period of the French and Indian war. I enjoyed the historical notes at the end of the book where she tells you what was directly from history and where she had to fudge things to make the novel work.

She tells that she learned about The Lost Gold of Minerva, Ohio through a Ohio newspaper dated 1875, Fort Wildnerness/Fort Stanwick, The story of Mademoiselle and the Pig, The Klocks, Glass Grenades and Wyandot or Wendat or Huron? Interesting story behind all these items. It was a different story filled with powerful action packed moments, mystery, intrigue told through heart-warming characters I instantly connected with.

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